Covid-19 Update

Tours at our historic houses are on the hour beginning at 10 am Monday through Saturday, and 12 pm on Sunday. Last tour of the day begins at 4 pm.
Masks must be worn while visiting The Charleston Museum and its historic houses. Thank you for helping our community slow the spread of COVID-19.
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General News

2019 New Accessions

Cash box and key, Donated by Mary and George Hlavaty. 2019 Accessions List: Mid-19th century silver cream pitcher, marked by Charleston silversmith John Ewan. Donated by Margaret Pringle Schachte.  Brick from the Echaw Church Cemetery of St. James Santee Parish in the Francis Marion Forest. Donated by the Huguenot Society…

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General News

A Word from our Director, Carl Borick

A very Happy New Year to all the Museum’s supporters! Whether you are a member, donor, volunteer, an attendee of our programs or a general advocate, we greatly appreciate what you do for America’s First Museum. As we launch into 2020, I want to take a look back at the…

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General News

A Bottle of Old Quaker for Posterity

In its headline, with one-inch-tall letters, The News and Courier declared “Prohibition Dead” on December 6, 1933. However, it was not as if locals here were high and dry one day, then popping champagne corks the next. Despite the thirty-six states who ratified the 21st Amendment, South Carolina wasn’t one…

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General News

Seafaring Mascots & Four Legged Friends

Unnamed terrier gets a pet from a sailor aboard the USS Orion (AS-18) in Guantanamo Bay, 1947. Animals have long been used for practical military service. Horses, camels, and elephants have hauled soldiers, supplies, and weapons. Pigeons have carried messages, while dogs guarded troops and tracked enemies. Many have also…

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General News

Museum Partners with Warren Lasch Conservation Center to Restore a Colonial Ceramic Vessel

Conservation of museum collections usually involves those objects that are fragile or unstable.  Textiles such as Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s dress, furniture such as the Robert Walker bed at the Joseph Manigault House, or wood from archaeological contexts such as the pilings from the city’s early fortifications often require conservation treatment…

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