Covid-19 (Coronavirus) Update


The Charleston Museum, Heyward-Washington House & the Joseph Manigault House are OPEN.
Last tour of the day at the historic houses begins at 4 PM.


EFFECTIVE JULY 1: Per Charleston City Council ordinance all persons are required to wear face coverings when entering buildings open to the public within the City limits.
Masks must be worn while visiting The Charleston Museum and its historic houses.
Thank you for your cooperation and for helping our community to slow the spread of COVID-19.


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Category: General News

General News

A Luxurious Charleston: Chatelaines

Macaroni chatelaine marked by Jean Antoine Lepine, Paris, 1797. Belonged to Eliza Izard Pinckney.     “Madame moves quietly here to there, Step by step, stair to stair,  Aloft she carries candle with flame, Light catching the silver of her chatelaine.”    “A really fancy tool belt,” is how one might…

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General News

Remnants of “Hessian” Fort Possibly Under Battery Pringle

Some years ago, on a trip to England, Larry Cadigan, a long-time volunteer in the Museum’s archaeology department, brought back a photocopy of an 18th century map he had identified that showed a “Hessian” redoubt on the Stono River on James Island. Ron Anthony, the Museum’s Archaeologist, suspected that the…

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General News

America’s Growing Feet

When I open any of our drawers of historical shoes, the first comments I get are inevitably about how small they are. While some of this can be chalked up to tricks of the eye—forward-set heels and narrow insoles can make a shoe appear smaller—feet were indeed slightly smaller before…

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General News

Pets of Charleston Photo Contest

The Charleston Museum invites proud pet parents to enter their best photos of their fur-ever friends for the Pets of Charleston Photo Contest! Inspired by the Museum’s current exhibit in the Lowcountry Image Gallery, In the Company of Animals: Pets of Charleston, this photo contest celebrates the companionship between Charlestonians…

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General News

Burning Brick: A Lowcountry Industry

What can a seemingly unremarkable brick reveal about the development of the Lowcountry, its historic buildings, and the people who inhabited them? We have recently revised our exhibition on brickmaking to focus on those enslaved laborers and craftspeople who produced the brick, and indeed that built the Lowcountry. On display…

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