Covid-19 Update

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 2, 2021: Per Charleston County requirement all persons must wear face coverings when in Charleston County indoor public spaces. Accordingly, masks must be worn while visiting The Charleston Museum and its historic houses. Thank you for your cooperation and for helping our community to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

General News

The 2015 Archaeological Field School

Museum archaeologists joined Dr. Barbara Borg and 14 College of Charleston students for our 7-week archaeological field school this summer. Along the way, we excavated at two Museum properties and worked with colleagues and sister organizations at several others. The summer began with two weeks of testing at the plantation…

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General News

Storeroom Stories: Needlework Sampler, 1813

PAST EXHIBIT Made by Jane Eliza Taylor at age 9, this schoolgirl sampler is hand-worked on linen with two-ply silk thread. Stitches include cross, square, and eyelet. There is a small alphabet in capital and lower case letters in alternating colors and a larger alphabet in capital letters. There are…

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General News

On Parade, Into Battle: Women’s Uniforms

PAST EXHIBIT Included in our new exhibit, On Parade, Into Battle, is a selection of uniforms relating to the history of women in the military. Today, a woman can enter any branch of service and perform any duty, short of combat. However, this has not always been true. Women were…

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General News

Fashion Flashback: Similarities Between Dresses in 1920s and 1960s

PAST EXHIBIT In our current exhibition of Fashion Flashback: 1920s – 1960s, one thing that stands out to me is the amazing similarity of the 1920s and 1960s dresses. Both decades were heavily influenced by the younger generation, more outspoken and vibrant than perhaps in any other times. The 1920s,…

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General News

Storeroom Stories: Coprolites

PAST EXHIBIT Coprolite is the scientific term assigned to fossilized animal droppings. Just like any other fossil, all of the organic material has been completely replaced by minerals over millions of years buried in layers of sediment. Coprolites fall within a category of fossils known as trace fossils. Trace fossils…

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