Covid-19 Update

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 2, 2021: Per Charleston County requirement all persons must wear face coverings when in Charleston County indoor public spaces. Accordingly, masks must be worn while visiting The Charleston Museum and its historic houses. Thank you for your cooperation and for helping our community to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Category: General News

General News

Fashion Flashback: Similarities Between Dresses in 1920s and 1960s

PAST EXHIBIT In our current exhibition of Fashion Flashback: 1920s – 1960s, one thing that stands out to me is the amazing similarity of the 1920s and 1960s dresses. Both decades were heavily influenced by the younger generation, more outspoken and vibrant than perhaps in any other times. The 1920s,…

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General News

Storeroom Stories: Coprolites

PAST EXHIBIT Coprolite is the scientific term assigned to fossilized animal droppings. Just like any other fossil, all of the organic material has been completely replaced by minerals over millions of years buried in layers of sediment. Coprolites fall within a category of fossils known as trace fossils. Trace fossils…

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General News

Armed Forces Day – May 16, 2015

PAST EXHIBIT In honor of Armed Forces Day, we present a uniform from each branch of military service. The Army uniform was worn by Warren Ripley of Charleston during World War II. He served as a second lieutenant with the Army Field Artillery and with the Army Reserve until 1963….

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General News

Fashion and Function: Bonnets

PAST EXHIBIT Long before we knew the dangers of sun exposure and skin cancer, women were intent on protecting their fair skin from the ravages of sunlight and keeping their complexion fair. It was not fashionable in the mid 19th century, and indeed until the 1920s, for a woman of…

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General News

Storeroom Stories: Lusitania Medal

Fashion and Function: Bonnets   On May 7, 1915, a German submarine torpedoed and sank the British-built luxury liner Lusitania killing more than 1,100 civilian passengers. Claiming the ship was carrying weapons for World War I’s allied forces and was therefore justified in destroying it, German sculptor Karl Goetz set…

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