Covid-19 Update

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 2, 2021: Per Charleston County requirement all persons must wear face coverings when in Charleston County indoor public spaces. Accordingly, masks must be worn while visiting The Charleston Museum and its historic houses. Thank you for your cooperation and for helping our community to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

June 7 - October 31, 2021 | Lowcountry Image Gallery



Photograph colorization can not only be time consuming, it can be rather tricky at times. By using Artificial Intelligence to produce color, we are able to combine history with technology to bring black and white photographs to life. Come and view these historical photographs through a new lens.
(left) The Old Bridge, February 17, 1937, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940) <br>(right) Shrimp Vendor, c. 1938, Unknown Charleston Street, George Robert Lunz, Jr. (1909-1969) (left) The Old Bridge, February 17, 1937, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940)
(right) Shrimp Vendor, c. 1938, Unknown Charleston Street, George Robert Lunz, Jr. (1909-1969)
Over 90 percent of the photographs housed in the Museum’s Archives are black and white. And while many viewers find them historically charming, others find it difficult to see particular details within the image. By colorizing a black and white photograph, certain components otherwise overlooked, become visible.
Island Water Taxi, c. 1900 Charleston, Tidal Creek, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940) Island Water Taxi, c. 1900 Charleston, Tidal Creek, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940)
For years, photograph colorization was used mainly by high tech production companies. Recently however, computer programmers have created colorization operating systems that use Artificial Intelligence.
Aftermath of a Fire,  March 7, 1923, Cosgrove Avenue, North Charleston, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940) Aftermath of a Fire, March 7, 1923, Cosgrove Avenue, North Charleston, Morton Brailsford Paine (1883-1940)
Modeled after the human brain, the AI software can recognize objects in a photograph and determine their likely colors. Although, it can still be time consuming, colorizing a historical photograph is now more accessible to everyday users.

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