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December 1, 2020 - June 6, 2021 | Lowcountry Image Gallery



We brought it back! Because the Museum had to close its doors in the middle of the Portraits of the Lowcountry: Cased Images From the Archives exhibit earlier this year, we decided to reinstall it. In case you missed it, a selection of daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes are once again exhibited featuring individual and family portraits of the Lowcountry.
Unidentified Civil War soldier, c. 1861, Ambrotype Unidentified Civil War soldier, c. 1861, Ambrotype
The invention of photography made it possible to record an accurate portrait, rather than an artist’s notion. For the first time a true portrayal of the sitter, who oftentimes wanted their image immortalized performing a particular task or with specific props, could be captured.
The Douglass Family, (from left to right) John, Mary, Dennis and Andrew (on lap) c. 1860, Ambrotype The Douglass Family, (from left to right) John, Mary, Dennis and Andrew (on lap) c. 1860, Ambrotype
Many portraits were designed as a family tribute, some showcased everyday events, while others were created in times of war and given to a significant other for remembrance. However, some of the most poignant portraits found in our collection feature those of the enslaved.
(left) James W. Jones, 1856, Ambrotype (right) Hector, April 23, 1861, Gowrie Plantation, Ambrotype (left) James W. Jones, 1856, Ambrotype (right) Hector, April 23, 1861, Gowrie Plantation, Ambrotype
Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes were the early photographic processes. When developed, the image was carefully sealed in an image packet and then enclosed in a small case for protection. This photographic exhibit highlights many of these pictorial documents taken for prosperity.
Unidentified woman, undated, Quinby & Co., Artists of Charleston, Ambrotype Unidentified woman, undated, Quinby & Co., Artists of Charleston, Ambrotype