In Becoming Americans, explore Charleston’s important role in the American Revolution, from protest to independence.
More than 135 military engagements took place in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. Most were skirmishes involving patriot and loyalist militias. A few, however, were great battles which directly affected the out come of the war. In B​ecoming Americans, ​visitors will learn about the events and battles that transpired in Charleston and the surrounding areas, such as the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, the outcome of which led to an unexpected and uplifting victory for the patriots as well as adoption of the palmetto tree as a state symbol that remains to this day.
Becoming Americans​ includes a number of objects related to the Revolutionary War in South Carolina as well as a rare cartridge box carried by a member of the British Royal Artillery at the Battle of Lexington and Concord. This unit would later serve in the Siege of Charleston, the largest battle fought in South Carolina during the Revolution and the longest siege of the war.
This cartridge box (right) on display represents one of the best­-preserved examples of its kind from the Revolutionary War. This cartridge box (right) on display represents one of the best­-preserved examples of its kind from the Revolutionary War.
Francis Marion, or “The Swamp Fox,” was the most famous of South Carolina’s Revolutionary War partisan leaders. He is now immortalized across the state in the names of buildings, public squares, streets, and businesses. A dedicated case in B​ecoming Americans​ contains several of Francis Marion’s possessions, including one of his shoe buckles, a Chinese cup and saucer, a decanter case and two copies of letters he wrote regarding troops and supplies, the originals of which are housed in the Museum’s Archives. Also, included is the calvary saber carried by Sergeant Ezekial Crawford of General Marion’s Brigade.


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